Electrical Engineers

AUTOMATION RISK
CALCULATED
28%
risk level
POLLING
28%
Based on 913 votes
LABOR DEMAND
GROWTH
1.6%
by year 2032
WAGES
$103,320
or $49.67 per hour
Volume
182,210
as of 2022
SUMMARY
JOB SCORE
6.5/10

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Automation risk

28% (Low Risk)

Low Risk (21-40%): Jobs in this level have a limited risk of automation, as they demand a mix of technical and human-centric skills.

More information on what this score is, and how it is calculated is available here.

Some quite important qualities of the job are difficult to automate:

  • Originality

  • Social Perceptiveness

  • Negotiation

  • Persuasion

User poll

28% chance of full automation within the next two decades

Our visitors have voted there's a low chance this occupation will be automated. This assessment is further supported by the calculated automation risk level, which estimates 28% chance of automation.

What do you think the risk of automation is?

What is the likelihood that Electrical Engineers will be replaced by robots or artificial intelligence within the next 20 years?






Sentiment

The following graph(s) are included wherever there is a substantial amount of votes to render meaningful data. These visual representations display user poll results over time, providing a significant indication of sentiment trends.

Sentiment over time (yearly)

Growth

Slow growth relative to other professions.

The number of 'Electrical Engineers' job openings is expected to rise 1.6% by 2032

Total employment, and estimated job openings

* Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics for the period between 2021 and 2031
Updated projections are due 09-2023.

Wages

Very high paid relative to other professions

In 2022, the median annual wage for 'Electrical Engineers' was $103,320, or $49 per hour

'Electrical Engineers' were paid 123.1% higher than the national median wage, which stood at $46,310

Wages over time

* Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics

Volume

Greater range of job opportunities compared to other professions

As of 2022 there were 182,210 people employed as 'Electrical Engineers' within the United States.

This represents around 0.12% of the employed workforce across the country

Put another way, around 1 in 811 people are employed as 'Electrical Engineers'.

Job description

Research, design, develop, test, or supervise the manufacturing and installation of electrical equipment, components, or systems for commercial, industrial, military, or scientific use.

SOC Code: 17-2071.00

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Comments

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John dough says
The key aspects AI robots can't take from electrical engineer's role are the diversity of the profession, creativity in designing, and social perceptiveness. Although, the last aspect is one even electrical engineers lack, with many at varying levels. An bright electrical engineer possessing high creativity and social perceptiveness will be very hard to replace.
Mar 26, 2024 at 03:48 AM
John Dough (revised) says
The key aspects that AI robots can't take away from Electrical Engineer's role are the diversity of the profession, creativity in designing, and social perceptiveness. Although, the last aspect is one even current Electrical Engineers lack, with many at varying levels, and few to none at the mastery level. A bright Electrical Engineer possessing high creativity and social perceptiveness will be very hard to replace, nearly impossible.
Mar 26, 2024 at 07:20 PM
ezkha says
I think we should be able to (and must) prevent robots/AIs to become competent in electrical engineering, and thus achieving self replication. There are many uncertainties and possible consequences if the other route is taken instead.

On the other hand, since AIs have a chance to replace software engineering (and maybe also become efficient in cyber security and other CS domains), the ability for it to program itself might be slightly less risky, provided material/physical restrictions for performing certain actions are in place. At least compared to its potential benefits.

Worst case scenario is to have an SCP-079 that causes a massive physical threat to humanity to be unleashed (e.g. takedown of hospitals or containment breach of an darned un-killable XK-scenario hostile reptile being), but at least it isn't the physical threat itself.
Mar 14, 2024 at 04:50 PM
Just An Hot Take says
That doesn't make sense because if you give free will in terms of software for an AI then it can easily learn to control psychical objects through computer networks...

I believe you either block AI self-programming itself or you won't be able to control whatever it wants to do.
Mar 26, 2024 at 11:52 PM
Wyan Francis (Low) says
I’m not sure for certain, I’m just using my own opinionated logic. EE has to do with wiring and building circuits, which AI itself is created on. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying that in the future AI won’t be able to do so, but in the near future I don’t think so.
Feb 17, 2024 at 08:16 PM
Flo says
Electrical engineers must use more and more AI to improve their productivity. They even should organize small events to diffuse knowledge among their peers, in order to use technology the best way possible. And this, always keeping in mind the upcoming developments and the future challenges of the organization they work for. They should use AI while adapting the way they do their job to stay useful and in a leading position.
Nov 18, 2023 at 02:11 PM
Flo says
Electrical engineers must use more and more AI to improve their productivity. They even should organize small events to diffuse knowledge among their peers, in order to use technology the best way possible. And this, always keepind in mind the upcoming developments and the future challenges of the organization they work for. They should use AI while adapting the way they do their job to stay useful and in a leading position.
Nov 18, 2023 at 02:05 PM
Ninjamokama_3 (No chance) says
Unless they make robots that are flexible, durable and reliable enough and have developed enough conciousness to replace human labour and thinking, this is going to be a no for me.
Nov 10, 2023 at 03:10 PM
Matt (Low) says
Electrical engineers would be required in the short-medium time frame of AI development to design, manufacture & maintain infrastructure for AI development.
Jun 19, 2023 at 01:39 AM
Jose says
Honestly, I'm an electrical engineer and what I see in AI is that it will simply boost your productivity, but in the short to medium term, I find it very unlikely that it will replace us. I myself use AI tools and I know they make mistakes. On the other hand, you have a lot of human interaction, when talking with operators, distributors, customers, and coordinating all of that. AI is very good, for example, when consulting regulations, but the day an AI can call a subcontractor, understand that Manolo had to leave the construction site because his wife got sick, and that this will cause a delay, then call the customer and explain it and reorganize the entire schedule, we will be talking about an AI that will be capable of doing everything a human does and we will be talking about a very different society.
I am quite skeptical. Only time will tell.
Apr 22, 2023 at 08:02 AM
cum dump (Low) says
At a Master's/PhD level, electrical engineers will always be needed. Even if drafting can easily become fully automated.
Dec 17, 2022 at 12:01 AM
Peter (Uncertain) says
Electrical engineers are the precursors of automation, it is inherent to this profession. The electric grid for example is mostly operated by itself, but always will be necessary for humans to assess for risks and plan and manage improvements, act when a fault occurs, etc.
Dec 28, 2021 at 08:42 PM
Lovro (No chance) says
This is the job that takes away other jobs. Not vice versa
Dec 27, 2021 at 04:06 PM
Bela Szabo (Low) says
Who will be programming the AIs if the electrical engineers are left? I say they will be more than ever.
Dec 13, 2021 at 03:57 PM
Just An Hot Take says
I think you are mistaking computer scientists with EEs. However I believe they share a lot in common. If one goes down, the other goes as well.
Mar 26, 2024 at 11:56 PM
Josh says
I've seen AI do some amazing things when it comes to placement, routing, clock tree synthesis, and fault corrections. Its only a matter of time, and probably sooner than most people think, before AI replaces anyone working on VLSI stuff
Apr 14, 2021 at 01:19 AM
Devadut S Balan says
Mixed circuit design is probably safe. Without data AI cant do much.
Dec 15, 2023 at 08:34 AM
Steven (No chance) says
Electricals Engineers are inherent to the process of automatization.
Mar 16, 2021 at 09:18 PM
Ferenc Kiss (Uncertain) says
Because an electrical engineer needs to invent a machine, which can invent better machine than humans or other engineers can. This can pertain to software as well, instead of machines. And if this happens, the profession of electrical engineering may become obsolete and superfluous.
Feb 17, 2021 at 10:44 PM
Laurentiu Duma (Low) says
Somebody must develop new electrical systems (and find strange failures)
Dec 12, 2020 at 10:00 AM
Jake (Low) says
Engineering takes intellect not yet accomplished by AI.
Dec 21, 2019 at 04:31 AM
Tomcat (No chance) says
Somebody must repair and maintain those robots
Aug 16, 2019 at 07:15 AM
mr x says
They will fix themselves, there won't be a job they can't do.
Nov 21, 2019 at 02:21 AM
valian says
dude they make robots
Jul 04, 2019 at 06:18 AM

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